After a 20 year cover-up, the BBC finally acknowledges how false rape accusations cause suicides

Last night saw TV history made in the UK, with the BBC broadcasting a documentary titled “I am not a rapist”. Shown on BBC One, the 44 minute programme examined the cases of victims of false rape accusations, and very surprisingly for the BBC nowadays , it did a rather good job of it too.

The programme is advertised as follows: “This gripping film tells the dramatic story of three young men falsely accused of rape, and the devastating consequences the allegations had on their lives.” The three victims in question are Liam Allen from South London, Ashley from Abertillery in Wales, and finally Jay Cheshire from Southampton. The Allen and Cheshire cases are shown retrospectively, with some re-enactments of scenes owing to the fact that the case occurred several years previously, whereas Ashley’s case is somewhat different as filing occurs as events are unfolding.

One slight issue with the broadcast is that it regularly uses the term “complainant” to describe false accusers. This is of course legally the correct term and far better than the BBC’s previous record of front page headlines stating that those on trial for making false rape accusations of rape were “rape victims”. However, using the term “complainant” so regularly somewhat takes away from the fact that the false rape accusers are committing heinous criminal acts.

Thankfully, the programme steadily improves in quality as time progresses, and it clearly demonstrates so many of the common impacts of false accusations. Not only the mental trauma and psychological impacts, but the impact on friends and family and how the victims’ lives are on hold (even after being cleared). The broadcast also shows tangible impacts, for example the loss of employment when being accused not to mention difficulty in obtaining employment even when cleared “without a stain on their character”.

The broadcast is interspersed with, statistics about rape cases, some of which are barely-relevant, particularly early on. However, these on-screen stats soon become far more useful and they inform us that “Since 2016, 1419 men under investigation for rape or sexual assault have died ‘untimely deaths’

This is a simply eye-watering statistic, and while it’s hard to estimate the number of false accusations, all things being equal then at the very least that’s hundreds of dead innocent men killed by false rape accusers.

Despite the lack of promotion of the programme from the BBC and its relegation to a later time slot, we’re delighted to see that it’s currently fourth most popular programme on BBC iPlayer. And we’re particularly delighted becasue it finally means our long campaign on this issue has resulted in a sucess.

At HEqual we conducted an investigation into the BBC’s reporting of UK false rape accusations which resulted in the suicide of the victim. We studied every case we could find in the media from the last two decades, and found that the BBC (and the Guardian) had failed to report on a single one!

We then also ran a campaign to try get the BBC to actually report on Jay Cheshire’s suicide, promoting the relevant local news reporters at BBC South at every stage of the story to do the jobs they were being paid to do and report on the case. They failed in their duties to viewers completely, refusing to utter or print a single word about the case, just as they had done with every other such case previously. The BBC was only finally forced to acknowledge the case following the tragic suicide of Jay’s mother, and even then waited months to report the story. Furthermore, the focus of their reporting was that of mental health failures by the NHS not recognising Karin Cheshire was at risk of suicide, thus they never directly once reported on Jay’s death as a story in itself nor gave appropriate attention to the root cause of her death

This refusal by the BBC to report on the case was then massively compounded by the contrast with its simply fraudulent (and front page) reporting on the Eleanor de Freitas case, a false accuser who took her own life, and the treatment of two stories when contrasted proved the obscene BBC bias on the issue beyond any doubt.

Thankfully, the BBC’s cover-up of false rape cases resulting in the suicide of the victim (and not the criminal) appears to be at an end, and thus we can finally consider the HEqual campaign to be a sucess. It really is a compelling documentary, in fact 95% of the broadcast feels as if it doesn’t belong on the BBC at all, which is a simply massive compliment in 2020.

It’s clear that a lot of work has been put into the documentary and it shows. It manages to cover all three cases reasonably well within the 44 minutes and even with our knowledge of the cases it’s hard to fault much of the content. The only obvious mistake and omission in the piece occurs towards the end in which Allen’s (otherwise excellent) defence lawyer appears to blame the evidence disclosure scandal on a lack of funding/resources combined with an increase in rape allegations. No doubt any lack of funding didn’t help matters, but anyone with the slightest insight into the scandal knows that the overwhelming issue was politically motivated misandry directed right form the top. The prosecution (and thus any deaths) of innocent men resulted directly from CPS policy and thus the vast majority of the blame lies at the door of the likes of utterly despicable radical feminist Alison Saunders.

The ending of the broadcast is particularly powerful, not merely in terms of drama and emotion, but more in terms of facts too.

We’re correctly infomred that there’s no “political mileage” in prosecuting false accusers and the broadcast also notes how none of the three victims prosecuted the people who ruined (or ended) their lives. Most importantly of all, we’re told that false allegations are only officially recorded if the accuser ADMITS their complaint was untrue. This fact in itself utterly destroys so many feminist arguments about statistics on this issue and it clearly shows such official statistics are therefore a nonsense. Such statistics become particularly farcical when when one considers the failures to prosecute even the most blatant false accusers – there’s almost no attempt to get false accusers to admit they’re lying and as we see in two of the three cases, they’re simply allowed to withdraw their false allegations as if they’d never happened.

The most powerful messages are at the end of the broadcast where the programme notes that a minimum of 1,500 men are falsely accused of rape per year. The documentary quite brilliantly explains that all three false rape allegation cases covered were not recorded as false accusations. This is simply extraordinary, becasue it means even the most blatant cases of false accusations where the evidence was completely debunked in court using the accuser own words are still not recorded either as false allegations, let alone the horrific crimes that they are.

Refreshingly, instead of having to despatch complaints or requests for retractions of utterly dishonest material, for once we’re in a position to owe thanks and congratulations to the director, Huw Crowley, on his work. We’ve contracted him to express out gratitude and point out the historic nature of his documentary and how it partly brings to an end the BBC’s cover-up of suicides caused by false rape accusations. (and we did of course give him a few pointers as how he could have made the documentary even better too.)

Of course the BBC is a vast organisation, and the fact that BBC TV have got things right on this one occasion doesn’t mean BBC News have learned any lessons. In fact we’re still in the position whereby the news wing of the BBC again still hasn’t even directly reported on a false rape accusation in the UK resulting in suicide any time in the last twenty years. This documentary most certainly is must-see viewing for anyone interested in equality issues, and even more so for any BBC staff! However, the overwhelming pattern going back many years with the BBC is to produce the odd token quality broadcast concerning men’s issues, perhaps ever 2-3 years, only revert back to their standard output of everyday misandry, marginalisation of men’s issues, and outright lying the rest of the time.

Readers in the UK can watch the programme in full here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p08pldr0/i-am-not-a-rapist

If you enjoy reading HEqual and the work we do please consider making a donation so we can continue promoting equality and tackling discrimination.

12 thoughts on “After a 20 year cover-up, the BBC finally acknowledges how false rape accusations cause suicides

  1. Hi there. Yes indeed, it’s a development, but what about the bogus 8% statistic and complete absence of any interrogation of it?
    Here’s my complaint to the BBC:
    Case number CAS-6308892-D3Q3W3
    Your 8% figure is a false, politically motivated low estimate: at best an ultra-conservative guess, albeit not the risible Brownmiller figure often still trotted out. Just pointing out at the end that the figure may be higher is unacceptable. * Met Police rape investigators — those most in the know — surveyed by Sir Ian Blair, estimate it’s 50% to 70%. * Similar surveying of police services around the world all come in somewhere between 50% & 90%. * Any proper or half-decent analysis of the two Home Office special reports on rape, examining the basis & demand characteristics of the ‘no crime’ & ‘no further action’ recording categories, would give a most reasonable estimate of 30%-35%. It’s likely the majority of rape reports to police are false. As has been well researched, complaints can be precipitated by even very mild embarrassment re sexual mores: attempt to seek a cover story. Rather than malicious, the majority of false allegations begin with a ‘white lie’ over which the complainant subsequently loses control. Additionally, a major issue is victimhood & vulnerability of females being sexually attractive (Goetz, Easton, Lewis & Buss, 2012; Rainville & Gallagher, 1990), so a female ‘crying rape’ also can have a dimension of ‘damsel in distress’ proceptive behaviour — manipulative or ‘non-conscious’ — generally or selectively to draw male attention by evoking natural male protectiveness. If we accepted feminist claim that if, unlike for other serious crime, victims fail to report, with only 1 in 10 doing so, then even if the propensity to falsely allege were the same as for other crimes (3%), then this would translate into 30% of rape reports being bogus. But we know that the propensity to falsely allege is uniquely very high re rape. Yet again, the BBC reveals itself to be statistically/scientifically illiterate & rigging in support of political-extreme-Left ‘identity politics’ hate-mongering towards men, even here amid at last some consideration of men.

  2. Meanwhile, feminists are still brushing the issue away by claiming false rape accusations rarely ever happen even though the police (privately and anecdotally) estimate they’re around 40% of all accusations.

    Maybe if they didn’t put themselves on such a high pedestal, they’d be more comfortable telling the truth instead of explaining away their infidelity with accusations of rape. Maybe it wouldn’t happen as much if our universities would stop pushing the concept of retroactive withdrawal of consent. Bad sex isn’t rape, it’s literally just a consequence of deciding to fuck someone without knowing them at all. I can hear it now, “Personal responsibility? What’s that?”

    Quick aside: if lying about our income makes us rapists then so does your make-up.

    • Well hardly could they actually name any individuals in the instances they covered, for very clear legal reasons.
      That’s the issue of anonymity being blatantly and seriously sex discriminatory, of course.
      What they should have done is examine the cases where the complainant was prosecuted for false allegation.
      Actually, the focus on clear cases of gross injustice where the false accuser cannot even be named nicely highlights the whole injustice surrounding the judicial treatment of rape allegation.
      The Boob has a very long way to go on this, and I’ve formally complained myself of their use of the 8% figure, but as the article here outlines, this is a considerable step for the Boob, nevertheless.

    • @wisemanner

      The article was about the BBC mentioning false rape accusers occasionally, against a background of their not doing so very often.

  3. The BBC of course still provides the liars with complete anonymity, and during the documentary states that it’s been “Estimated that up to 8% of rape allegations are false”. No, BBC. It’s been estimated that up to 60% are false. Various studies have put it at averaging between 30% and 60% of allegations being false.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8135653/
    https://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-53-rape-cases-filed-between-april-2013-and-july-2013-false-delhi-commission-of-women-2023334

  4. I can’t wonder whether all these false rape accusers are militant lesbian feminists in disguise attacking heterosexual men in a war against heterosexuality since according to Dworkin all straight sex is rape.

  5. Yes, a development for the BBC in at last showing some consideration for men, but the 8% figure is a deception based on counting only freely, fully admitted false allegation by the complainant, so is a huge under-estimate of the actual proportion of false reports of rape, and as such is a false, politically motivated low estimate: at best an ultra-conservative guess. At least they didn’t use the risible Brownmiller figure often still trotted out. Just pointing out at the end that the figure may be higher is nowhere near good enough.
    * As the author of the recent paper on ‘false rape’ from Nottingham University’s Dept of Criminology conceded, there’s barely anyone across the police and judiciary who do not consider a very large proportion of rape reports to be false. That’s experience much more than any prejudice.
    * Met Police rape investigators — those most in the know of all — surveyed by Sir Ian Blair, estimate it’s 50% to 70%.
    * Similar surveying of police services around the world all come in somewhere between 50% & 90%.
    * Any proper or half-decent analysis of the two Home Office special reports on rape, examining the basis & demand characteristics of the ‘no crime’ & ‘no further action’ recording categories, would give a most reasonable estimate of 30%-35%. It’s likely the majority of rape reports to police are false. As has been well researched, complaints can be precipitated by even very mild embarrassment re sexual mores: attempt to seek a cover story. Rather than malicious, the majority of false allegations begin with a ‘white lie’ over which the complainant subsequently loses control. Additionally, a major issue is victimhood & vulnerability of females being sexually attractive (Goetz, Easton, Lewis & Buss, 2012; Rainville & Gallagher, 1990), so a female ‘crying rape’ also can have a dimension of ‘damsel in distress’ proceptive behaviour — manipulative or ‘non-conscious’ — generally or selectively to draw male attention by evoking natural male protectiveness.
    If we accepted feminist claim that if, unlike for other serious crime, victims fail to report, with only 1 in 10 doing so, then even if the propensity to falsely allege were the same as for crimes in general (3%), then this would translate into 30% of rape reports being bogus. But we know that the propensity to falsely allege is uniquely very high re rape.

  6. Pingback: “I Am Not A Rapist” and the HEqual reaction

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